Morning Heel Pain: Causes and Treatment

heel pain in the morning

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Heel pain is a common complaint of people who have been experiencing foot and ankle pain in the morning. The most likely cause of heel pain is Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, two different conditions that are both caused by inflammation in the lower leg muscles.

In this article, we will explore causes and treatments for these painful conditions so you can get relief from your symptoms! The following are things that might cause morning heel pain:

  • Poor posture during sleep;
  • Flat feet (possible) ;
  • Plantar fasciitis (inflammation under foot);
  • Gouty arthritis (painful joints often caused by uric acid build up );

If this is not just an isolated incident then it’s important to see a doctor to check on the situation. cushions, or from pressure in the muscle caused by sitting for long periods of time during the daytime hours. Often morning heel pain will also be attributed to running and sports activities which can cause inflammation to develop.

Waking up to pain is hard!

Having heel pain in the morning manifests as pain or stiffness from the heel to the ball of your foot, especially on first getting out of bed in the morning.

It’s hard to walk with such pain, situation worsens as you walk around in bare feet and after a while.

If you are experiencing pain that feels like an intense burning sensation coming from the bottom of your foot, it could be plantar fasciitis, which is common in athletes and people who have jobs where they’re on their feet all day long.

It usually occurs after periods of rest or sitting for prolonged periods during the time you don’t exercise, and can show up as a sharp pain on the bottom of your heel when you first get out of bed in the morning.

If it’s taking you more than 15 minutes to put weight on that foot, there could be something wrong with your Achilles tendon or calf muscle tightness; if this is not helped by rest or ice then you should make an appointment to see a doctor.

The pain should also subside if you avoid walking barefoot on hard surfaces (such as concrete) and try to give your feet a break by wearing comfortable shoes and resting them.

You might also want to try stretching your Achilles tendon, calf muscles, or feet that are tight with a massage ball, foot stretcher (a rolled up towel), squeezable rubber ball, or other pressure point device.

In the following paragraphs, we are going to discuss the main causes and available treatments for that uncomfortable morning heel pain.

Morning heel pain can be caused by plantar fasciitis, or inflammation of the tissue that connects your toes to your feet and runs along the bottom of your foot.

The most common cause is overuse due to excessive running or jumping on hard surfaces without a break in between activities.

What could be behind my heel pain?

Causes of Heel Pain:

The most common causes for heel pain are Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. Both can be caused by inflammation in the muscles that come from walking, running or jumping on hard surfaces like concrete. These conditions may also occur as a result of shoes with high heels or an ankle injury (such as a sprain).

main cause behind morning heel pain is plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation of the tissue that connects your toes to your feet and runs along the bottom of your foot.

What is the main cause of plantar fasciitis?

The main cause of plantar fasciitis is inflammation in the tissue that connects your toes to your feet and runs along the bottom of your foot.

Most common causes for heel pain are Achilles tendonitis, which can be caused by overuse from excessive running or jumping on hard surfaces without a break in between activities

Painful symptoms may also be due to heel spurs, which are calcium deposits on the bone that can eventually lead to a foot deformity called Haglund’s syndrome.

Achilles tendonitis: Achilles tendonitis is inflammation of the tissue connecting your calf muscles and ankle bones. This overuse injury may result from excessive running or jumping without taking frequent breaks on hard surfaces such as concrete. Painful symptoms may also be caused by heel spurs, which are calcifications in the tissues of the Achilles’s point (heel) that eventually turn into a foot deformity known as Haglund’s syndrome.

Heel Spur Syndrome: Another common cause for heel pain is an issue with bone growth in the area where you have sustained trauma to your heel, such as from an ankle sprain or running. This condition is called heel spur syndrome.

There are a number of factors that can lead to the development of Achilles tendonitis including aging, variations in anatomy – like having long feet and short calves -and overuse injuries. In some cases, it’s related to getting enough exercise while others have found relief after quitting their jobs involving extensive standing for prolonged periods at work and/or demanding sports activities.

Heel Spur Syndrome: Damage to the area where your heel meets with your foot can cause bone growth around this injury site which may lead to problems within the tissue connecting muscle and bones (the “tendons”).

Related Article: 5 Plantar Fasciitis Home Remedies You Can Try

How do I get rid of the pain in my heel?

The first step in the diagnosis of Achilles tendonitis is ruling out other causes. The next steps are to assess whether there have been any recent changes to your daily activities or a new activity that you’ve taken on, and if so how many hours per day complete those tasks. Your physician may also ask about previous injuries involving this area, as well as medications being used for pain relief.

Achilles Tendonitis Treatment:

Treatments vary depending on severity ranging from non-invasive techniques such as rest, ice packs and medication (e.g., ibuprofen) up through more invasive options like surgery (notably when symptoms persist). Pain management might be needed before treatment can begin with some cases improving naturally on its own .

Treatment for Achilles tendonitis can include:

Rest from painful and aggravating activities, icing the involved area to reduce inflammation, especially after exercise. The ice should be applied 20 minutes every hour or two as needed;

Elevating your heel when you’re sitting or lying down by using pillows under your ankle between it and anything that might press against it such as sofa back cushions or bedding beneath your feet while resting in bed (this reduces pain because gravity helps return fluid within the tissues of the Achilles Tendon to its proper position);

Drugs like ibuprofen may also relieve some symptoms associated with this condition.

When should I see a doctor for heel pain then? what would be recommended?

Your doctor may recommend a corticosteroid injection in your ankle joint if you have inflammation and pain on both sides of the heel or Achilles tendon. Injections can help reduce inflammation, but they don’t cure any underlying problems. Cures for chronic cases usually involve surgery to remove part of the inflamed tissue from around the tendon.

The treatments possible for your heel pain:

Rest:

stop or limit activities that worsen your pain, it’s better that way!

Ice:

Apply ice to the area of inflammation for 15 minutes every three hours, in order to reduce swelling and prevent tissue damage.

Anti inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen:

Take this at a higher dose than you would regularly (i.e., 800mg) if prescribed by your doctor; avoid taking aspirin because it can cause stomach bleeding.

Injections with corticosteroids/anti-inflammatories like Kenalog or Fluoro-Saccharide acetate

They may help alleviate some symptoms associated with heel pain but they don’t cure any underlying problems so surgery is usually recommended in chronic cases involving severe inflammation around the Achilles tendon near where it attaches to the heel.

Reducing weight and changing your diet

To include more vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains may help improve how you feel in the morning due to reduced inflammation levels which can be caused by increased body fat or a high glycemic index diet (one that has a lot of fast absorbing carbohydrates).

Stretch:

Get up slowly out of bed and when standing stretch both feet backwards pointing toes towards each other; hold for 30 seconds then swing them back forwards with heels together. This should open up any tight calf muscles or Achilles tendons on either side of the ankle joint. Repeat this three times before bending down to pick something off the floor

  • it’s important to keep knees slightly bent when squatting so they don’t lock, and exhale when coming up
  • avoid crossing one leg over the other in a seated position; this can cause pressure on nerves.
  • if you have large feet or high arches try wearing shoes with cushioned soles
  • buy an orthotic shoe insert like Waltsonstec for extra support (make sure it’s because your heel is too low)
  • put cold packs around your foot before bed to relieve inflammation that may be caused by arthritis or gout, both of which are more common as we age.

Some quick tips:

Reduce weight through dieting and exercise – Drink plenty of water throughout the day to reduce obesity levels and not aggravate swollen joints. This will also help prevent dehydration related morning headaches and other symptoms of chronic dehydration – Try to avoid shoes with a heel higher than one inch.

Wear comfortable, lightweight shoes for walking or standing all day long.

Reduce weight through dieting and exercise; Drink plenty of water throughout the day to reduce obesity levels and not aggravate swollen joints. This will also help prevent dehydration related morning headaches and other symptoms of chronic dehydration; Try to avoid shoes with a heel higher than one inch.; Wear comfortable, lightweight shoes for walking or standing all day long; Finally, make sure you get enough sleep at night!

A lack of adequate rest will only lead to more morning pain and discomfort. that’s why you have to:

Try to avoid shoes with a heel higher than one inch, wear comfortable, lightweight shoes for walking or standing all day long;

Reduce weight through dieting and exercise; Drink plenty of water throughout the day to reduce obesity levels and not aggravate swollen joints. This will also help prevent dehydration related morning headaches and other symptoms of chronic dehydration; Reduce nighttime snoring by sleeping on your side instead lying flat on your back.; If snoring is excessive, it may be time for a visit to the ear nose throat doctor for a consultation and possible treatment.

Stretch your feet, calves, hamstrings and other muscles of the legs at least twice per day.

Keep toenails trimmed short as they can cause irritation or pain when coming into contact with the skin in particular if you wear open back shoes.

Avoid standing all day long on hard surfaces like concrete floors. If this is unavoidable then make sure it’s not constant but rather breaks up over time so that joints are allowed some relief from pressure. Follow these simple tips and morning heel pain should be manageable!

Finally, make sure you get enough sleep at night!

Related Articles: The Importance of Arch Support: How to Maintain Balance and Prevent Injury

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