Burning Feet: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

burning feet, feet burning syndrome, hot feet, burning foot pain

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Burning feet syndrome is a condition that can be caused by many different factors. This article will discuss the symptoms, causes, and treatments for burning feet syndrome. Burning feet syndrome is characterized by an uncomfortable sensation of warmth or pain in one’s feet, often during hot weather or after being on your feet for long periods of time.

It may feel like pins and needles pricking at the soles of your feet with each step you take. You might also experience tingling sensations up to your shins as well as swelling in some cases.

Sometimes these feelings are worse when you wake up in the morning because blood flow has been minimized due to bedding overnight. In this article, we’ll talk about why it happens, what it feels like and the best treatment options.

Burning feet syndrome is a condition that affects the skin of your feet, and it’s characterized by an intense burning sensation in one or both feet.

It can also be triggered by hot weather, but this isn’t always the case. Burning foot syndrome often leaves sufferers with red streaks on their feet or blisters which need to be looked at as soon as possible because they could indicate another medical issue like diabetes or peripheral vascular disease.

Symptoms of burning feet syndrome

It includes a burning sensation in the feet that is often worse when you wake up. It can be triggered by hot weather or prolonged standing, but this isn’t always the case. Sufferers may also have red streaks on their feet and blisters which need to be looked at as soon as possible because they could indicate another medical issue like diabetes or peripheral vascular disease.

The first thing you should do if you experience burning feet syndrome is, go see your doctor for an answer so it doesn’t get any worse!

There are many different treatments available depending on what caused your symptoms, these range from topical medications to wearing compression socks (in order to reduce swelling) and avoiding certain activities that worsen the condition such as running barefoot across concrete sidewalks.

If these symptoms persist for more than two weeks despite taking over-the-counter medication, you should consider seeing your doctor about getting professional help.

Causes of burning feet syndrome:

can include a lack of blood supply to the feet, neuropathy (nerve damage), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and diabetes, or diabetic neuropathy.

Burning feet syndrome can be caused by many different factors including nerve damage, medication side effects, or diabetes with poor circulation in your blood vessels. If you feel like it’s being triggered by hot weather then it might also be because of a condition called peripheral neuropathy which is when nerves are damaged so they’re not efficient at regulating blood flow to these areas such as your feet during heatwaves. It can be related to low blood pressure.

Another possibility is that you have reduced sensation due to diabetic complications or another type of illness causing numbness and burning pain on top of each other, this may mean there’s an infection somewhere too!

These are just some causes for burning feet syndrome but before we talk about treatments let’s discuss what symptoms look like first.

If you feel like it’s being triggered by hot weather then it might also be because of a condition called peripheral neuropathy which is when nerves are damaged so they’re not efficient at regulating blood flow to these areas such as your feet during heatwaves.

Another possibility is that you have reduced sensation due to diabetic complications or another type of illness causing numbness and burning pain on top of each other – this may mean there’s an infection somewhere too!

The burning feet syndrome usually starts with a sudden sensation of hot, sweaty and painful feet, they may feel like they’re on fire or heated up from the inside.

Aside from this tingly, prickling feeling you might also notice that your soles are red or swollen which is due to lack of blood flow making them more vulnerable to heat stress. It’s important to note here that if you have diabetes then these symptoms can be present at any time during the day even if it’s not hot outside so get in touch with your doctor as soon as possible!

If the pain doesn’t go away after cooling down for about 20 minutes then there could be an infection somewhere too such as cellulitis (infection deep under skin) although don’t try and diagnose yourself as it could lead to serious consequences – if you’re unsure, see a doctor.

The most common causes of burning feet are diabetes or peripheral neuropathy (which is nerve damage). In these cases the nerves that carry messages between your brain and foot can’t function properly which then results in sensation problems like pain with hot water touching the feet for example.

For this reason people who have diabetes should keep an eye on their blood sugar levels at all times so they don’t experience any painful side-effects!

If you know what’s causing the problem then make sure to deal with it right away because untreated symptoms can get worse over time which means more discomfort and pain. If not, it might be worth getting seen by a doctor if the burning feet don’t start to go away.

Can this be treated with home remedies or over-the-counter medication?

No, it is recommended that you see a medical professional as soon as possible before symptoms get worse and/or lead to other health problems. It’s important for people who have diabetes especially to monitor their blood sugar levels regularly so they catch any issues before they progress.

What should I do at home first before going in?

There are some natural treatments that can help like soaking your feet in warm water, applying ointments containing soothing ingredients (like lavender), getting enough sleep and staying on top of prescribed medications – but it might not work out long term which means erring on the side of caution is always best.

Burning feet syndrome may be treated with over-the-counter medication like topical capsaicin cream for 20 days in conjunction with foot rest if severe burning sensation persists. However, more research needs to be done before making this treatment more widely known so tell your doctor about trying it first!

Treatment for burning feet syndrome:

  • Over the counter medication
  • Insoles
  • Adding extra padding to the shoe
  • Wearing socks with cotton mix to deal with that dry skin on the feet and help with the symptoms of dull ache.
  • Taking pain relievers (ibuprofen, acetaminophen)
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol before bed time. Sleep deprivation and dehydration can exacerbate burning feet syndrome symptoms so get a good night’s sleep!
  • Rest your feet by elevating them on an object like a pillow or stool that has been placed at waist height. This is important because it will help alleviate pressure from the lower leg muscle groups which reduces swelling in those areas; this helps reduce inflammation of tissues where there are nerves close to skin surface making you feel as if you’re walking on hot coals when putting weight down.
  • Soak your feet in cold water, it is very effective for this type of medical condition, it freshens up your feet and blood cells can reach your feet.
  • Having your feet in the air is a good way to reduce any swelling that has accumulated from being on your feet all day.
  • Keep ice cubes handy, because even this can help relieve burning feet syndrome symptoms – what does this mean?
  • Drinking lots of water will also be helpful with reducing inflammation and circulation problems associated with burning feet syndrome
  • Do not stand for prolonged periods of time which causes more pressure into joints by putting weight down with each step you take; it’s best if you sit or lie down. The following positions are recommended: bent knee (90 degrees), straight leg (0 degree) or lying flat on back at 45 degrees angle(best position). Avoid sitting cross legged as there may be more pressure on your feet
  • Try to elevate the feet which will reduce swelling, and rotate them in a circular motion. This is helpful for people who are experiencing burning foot pain due to nerve or muscle compression
  • Exercising regularly can help with burning feet syndrome because it increases circulation – what does this mean?
  • Use an ice pack at night before bed if you have been walking all day
  • If there are any red streaks or blisters, you should seek medical attention immediately and have them looked at (don’t try to pop them).
  • You can also use ointments containing soothing ingredients like lavender that will help with pain relief but it might not work out long term which mean erring on the side of caution by seeking a professional opinion is best.

Related Articles:

How to Take Care of Your Feet: Foot Exercises

Pain in Ball of Foot: How to Decrease Pain and Move with Ease

Solutions to Foot Pain at Night

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